Just six days to go

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Release date:  Sun, 24/06/2018 (All day) Main image:  Summary:  Just six days to go and 30 Days Wild will be gone for another year - so these days will be a challenge in themselves. So far, my best bit has been seeing a marsh harrier at Leighton Moss, the RSPB's reserve in North Lancashire. Seeing these endangered and much-bigger-than-I-imagined raptor flying over the reedbed was truly breath-taking. It is, in fact, the largest of the harriers at up to half a metre long with a wingspan up to 1.2 metres. read more...
Continue Reading » Just six days to go...

Hedgehog in the road

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Release date:  Sat, 23/06/2018 (All day) Main image:  Summary:  My wild act for day 23 started unexpectedly early. Bang on midnight to be exact. I was woken up by my dad, shouting that he had found a hedgehog that needed help. After throwing on a coat, I came outside to see my dad squatting in the road, attempting to coax the hedgehog into an old ice cream tub. The hedgehog was having none of it and snuffling in annoyance. read more...
Continue Reading » Hedgehog in the road...

Rising stars of the garden

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Release date:  Fri, 22/06/2018 (All day) Main image:  Summary:  We have a lot of foxgloves in our garden this year, growing out of the flowerbeds, various pots and even halfway up the stone walls. It is always a pleasure to see these tall and magnificent plants with their pink flower spikes, rising out of the geraniums in the garden. And it is also great to hear the bees when they wander into those tubular flowers and let out surprisingly contented hums and buzzes. Foxgloves are not just common in your garden they are also seen in woodlands and along our local river bank. read more...

Mainly Conder Green….What Again!

Posted on - In Birds2blog
I got no further than the Lune Estuary at Glasson Dock after my visit to Conder Green on Monday, where I saw more early returning waders when I found 4 Common Sandpiper and up to 145 Redshank, there was also the first returning Little Grebe in it's fine summer plumage. I was a little surprised to find my record of an even earlier Little Grebe here on 9 June 2017, but it'll be a while yet before the number builds to a double figure on Conder Pool by the autumn.Seven Common Tern were on Conder Pool, four adult and the three chicks still looking good Tuesday morning according to IP's report, despite savage attacks by the invaders from the island the previous day. The island pair have abandoned their breeding attempt, but an Avocet at the opposite end leads me to suspect they might be nesting on the back side of this is...

My own wild lookout

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Release date:  Thu, 21/06/2018 (All day) Main image:  Summary:  This may not look like heaven to many people, but this is my patch of wild paradise in the centre of urban sprawl. Still a work in progress, and perhaps something that will never be finished (really I don’t think anyone’s garden is ever finished) this is where I come most evenings to unwind after wrestling my way through the notorious inner-city traffic. When we first moved into our apartment, our balcony was an unloved space that clearly hadn’t been used for much more than storage in a long while – really it left very little to the imagination. re...
Continue Reading » My own wild lookout...

Pied Flycatcher RAS Interim Report

Posted on - In
Now got the data for about half our RAS study of Pied Flycatchers in the Lune valley woodlands.So far it has been a good season although there has been three reports of nest box predation by either weasels or stoats.So far in total we have ringed or retrapped 369 birds  made up of 33 males, 60 females and  286 nestlings. The later have survived well in the excellent June weather, the number of caterpillars on the Oak especially appears to be high, and the numbers of insects especially midges is amazing!A quick analysis of the retrap data shows that although 13 of the birds ringed as nestlings in previous years and retrapped breeding this year returned to their native wood, but 27 moved to other woods within the Lune valley. But  of adult birds 13 returned to the wood they breed in last year and only  two changed woods. T...

Underground And Overground.

Posted on - In Another Bird Blog
We’ve had a few dreary mornings and I’d waited days for a bright, clear morning to drive into the hills with camera at the ready. Tuesday looked promising so I was up early and then drove north and east with fingers crossed as I left the coast behind. This was probably the last chance of the year as upland birds have already started their return journeys to coastal locations. "Click the pics" for close-ups. To The Coast There are not many Lapwing around now and I was counting ones and twos only, with little sign of late breeders. In my experience, Lapwings tend to give up rather than try again if their early breeding fails with small flocks appearing as early as mid-June. I found a good number of Curlew, some with large “running” chicks but also a good sized one learning the ropes of calling from a drystone wall.  ...

Brief update on recent sightings

Posted on - In Leighton Moss (RSPB)
Sightings of our mother bittern have been increasing lately, a tantalising prospect for all visitors. These regular flight paths now seem to cross from her nest (located close to the main dyke behind Lillian’s pool) past the front of Grisedale hide and on towards Barrow Scout, one of our satellite sites situated close to the Morecambe and Allen pools. Grisedale and the Skytower have been affording lucky visitors with excellent vistas of these classic ‘food flights’. Hundreds of young birds on the reserve continue to soar closer to adulthood. The clamour of fledglings can be heard from most paths, with young warblers and tits especially noticeable. Causeway hide remains an ideal setting for watching waterfowl younglings, with two pochard broods still showing well (one totaling 10, the other with 8) and numerous gadwall...

Meet the Dragonflies at Mere Sands Wood

Posted on - In Lancashire Wildlife Trust
Date / Time Start date:  Sat, 14/07/2018 - 1:00pm - 3:00pm Time details:  The walk will last around two hours. Dr Phil Smith, local dragonfly expert and enthusiast, will take you on a walk around the reserve, searching for the dragonfly species that call Mere Sands Wood home. The walk will last around two hours and there'll be plenty of opportunities to ask questions about these fascinating summer insects. Please book in person at the Visitor Centre or by phone. Booking in advance is highly recommended. Refreshments will be available and car parking is free to participants. Summary:  Join local dragonfly expert Dr Phil Smith on a walk to find these f...